The Complete Guide to choosing Blue Sapphire Engagement Rings

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The blue sapphire is by far the most valuable and popular of all the blue-colored gemstones belonging to the corundum group of minerals. A hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale places corundum second in rank behind diamonds as one of the hardest natural minerals used for jewelry. It is also the mineral that produces rubies.

Sapphires are available in many colors, but blue is the most common and most valuable. There are a wide variety of blue sapphire hues, ranging from pale blue to deep and intense shades. It is possible to find blue sapphires with traces of green or purple as well. When such a secondary color does not exceed 15% of the gem’s color, it is still referred to as blue sapphire. Nevertheless, sapphires with secondary colors do not have the same value or desirable qualities as ones with pure blue shades.

Blue sapphires offer the most distinct beauty among all sapphire colors (pink, yellow, white, green.), which has to be the reason they are a favorite of the royals for centuries. In recent years, bridal jewelry has also gained substantial popularity.

The Complete Guide to choosing Blue Sapphire Engagement Rings

 Blue Sapphire

Famous Blue Sapphire Engagement Rings

Since the 19th century, royalty and important figures have been selecting sapphire as a center stone for their engagement rings for centuries. At this moment, Kate Middleton’s 12-carat oval Ceylon blue sapphire ring is without a doubt the most famous blue sapphire engagement ring. It was purchased by Prince Charles in 1981 and wore by Princess Diana throughout her entire marriage.

Although Kate Middleton’s sapphire engagement ring is undoubtedly the most famous example of royal sapphires currently, it is by no means the only one historically available. When Napoleon proposed to Josephine in 1795, he gifted her with a blue sapphire and diamond ring inscribed with the words “You and Me.”

How to Pick a Sapphire Engagement Ring Stone

Color

Blue sapphires are valued according to their natural “true” blue color. Sapphires can range in color from pure blue to ones flecked with green or purple. Blue sapphires with more green or purple hints tend to be less true to their color. The tone and saturation of a sapphire’s color are the most important aspects. The sapphire can be light or dark blue, which determines the tone.

If a sapphire is too light, it will look less impressive, and if it is too dark, it will be harder to see the blue. Make sure that the tone stays in the middle of the scale so that the blue comes through while keeping it from becoming too dark so you cannot see the striking details in the gemstone. If you are considering the right saturation, then consider that sapphires of higher quality have consistent and vivid colors without brown or grey tints.

When choosing a blue sapphire, royal blue or cornflower blue is considered the most popular choice of all. The color of these stones ranges from dark to medium hue. The color of this sapphire is usually vibrant and has no grey or brown tones. However, some individuals may prefer violet-blue tones with higher saturation.

Clarity

It is extremely rare to find a flawless blue sapphire that is free of inclusions. Sapphires contain inclusions that are referred to as rutile needles. Blue sapphires are generally less prone to inclusions than diamonds. In order to check for inclusions, a gemologist typically uses a loupe with a 10x magnification. It is unlikely that a gemologist will use magnification while inspecting a sapphire. Most of the time, an engagement ring or other jewelry made from blue sapphires will be acceptable if it is “eye-clean,” which means it does not have any obvious inclusions.

CUT

Blue sapphires do not have a standardized cut. Moreover, to make the sapphire’s undeniable beauty stand out, it must be cut symmetrically to allow light to reflect at the proper angles. Sapphires are commonly cut into shapes such as emeralds, cushion rounds, and ovals. You should choose the cut that best suits the person it is intended for since there is no one “best” cut.

Carat Weight

The carat weights of blue sapphires are very similar to those of diamonds. A sapphire of one carat will often appear slightly smaller than a diamond of equivalent carat weight since sapphires are often heavier than diamonds. Therefore, comparing blue sapphires requires you to consider both the carat weight as well as the measures. It is therefore helpful when vendors such as James Allen offer measurements for loose sapphires in their inventory – for instance, this 1.07-carat blue sapphire measures 6.62×4.79mm.

Tips for Choosing the Best Blue Sapphire Ring

The selection of metals is very crucial. Despite the fact that blue sapphires look great in any setting, they tend to look best when paired with white metals, such as platinum or white gold. When paired this way, Sapphires will be highlighted by these metals, and their deep blue color is complemented.

Think about setting up a halo. A halo of small diamonds around a sapphire can make them look especially lovely. Setting round blue sapphires in halo settings, like this ring from the Blue Nile, perfectly highlights their beauty and size.

You need to make sure the sapphire’s measurements are accurate. The blue sapphire, as we mentioned above, will typically weigh more than diamonds of equivalent size. In order to size up a sapphire correctly, it’s important that you pay attention both to the measurements and the carat weight.

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